Friday, February 17, 2012

Works in progress: short row edition.

This month, perhaps more than most, Anne's desk at the shop has often been crowded by multiple works in progress. She has (ahem) a small handful of projects started, many of which will grow up to be shop samples, showing off particular yarns in patterns for which they are particularly well-suited. At the moment, I have only one project going at the shop, but more at home, lest you think I'm gloating. The impulse to cast on with an exciting new yarn is strong, and succumb to it we do. Here are two of the latest works in progress you're likely to catch us stitching on in quiet moments at the shop.

Anne is working on a shawl with the wooly, self-striping Kauni yarn, knowing that Nancy's Wiggle Wrap is not a permanent installation in the shop. When the Wiggle Wrap leaves us, we'll need something that shows what Kauni can do, and this shawl will do that very well.

The pattern is Wingspan, available as a free download on Ravelry, and it is an excellent example of just one of the many shapes that can be accomplished using short rows.

Myself, I'm at work on a ruffle scarf, another pattern full of short rows, albeit much shorter short rows. These rows are sometimes only 4 stitches long, short enough that I taught myself to knit backwards to save time on turning the needles around between short rows. If the pattern looks familiar, that's because we already have one ruffle scarf hanging in the shop, which I wrote about on the blog last May. That one was made with two yarns held together, and because of this, it's fuzzy, dense, and warm. With Spring on its way, and Cascade's Ultra Pima yarn unswatched, we thought a thinner cotton ruffle scarf was in order.

That's what we're up to, or part of what we're up to, at any rate. What are you working on lately?


  1. Up until Friday night, I was busy with pieces for the "Yarnboro" yarn bombing project! Our installation went up on Saturday (and that's my blue "sock" they're putting on the farmer's market water fountain).

    Yay for yarn!

  2. Also, that bat wing pattern is amazing!

  3. I was checking out the wingspan pattern on ravelry and noticed the stunning variations made by LanArta that use a swing knitting technique, which apparently involves short rows within short rows. I was wondering if anyone at the shop is familiar with swing knitting and, if so, would like to humbly request that they teach a class.